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Revised FTC Green Guides: The Video

October 2nd, 2012 No comments

FTC Green GuidesRevised FTC Green Guides: Now See the Movie

Austin, Texas  At Eco Marketing Solutions, our policy has always been that an educated customer is our best customer.

The FTC has just revised their Green Guides and we are going to make sure that we, and all our customers comply with these new changes.

Here is a link to a 7.25 minute video that sums up many of the new guidelines that you should find helpful.

Bottom line, back up and qualify and quantify all green claims.

Let’s all do our part to avoid green washing and make green claims more powerful and valid than ever before.

If you want more details from the FTC, this link from the FTC should help.

Here’s to a greener tomorrow, today.

 

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Ask us Your Green Marketing Questions Anytime at  Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutions and join the conversation.

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Robert Piller, President of Eco Marketing Solutions, has over 25 years of experience in running and implementing green marketing campaigns and is a leader in the recycled promotional products industry, including offering one of the largest selections of reusable and organic tote bags, recycled and biodegradable water bottles, recycled pens and pencils in the country.

His company’s website, EcoMarketingSolutions.com, features over 25,000 eco-friendly promotional items in all price ranges, for any business or organization interested in going green. The site’s handy search tool helps you easily find biodegradable, organic and recycled imprinted promotional items in your price range and time frame.

You can also reach him by email (robert (at) ecomarketingsolutions.com) or comment on his blog postings at GreenSpotBlog.com or below at his Twitter link.

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FTC Issues Revised Green Guides to Help Prevent Green Washing

October 2nd, 2012 No comments

FTC Issues Revised FTC GuidesNew Green Guides Will Help Marketers Avoid Making Misleading Environmental Claims

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Federal Trade Commission issued revised “Green Guides” that are designed to help marketers ensure that the claims they make about the environmental attributes of their products are truthful and non-deceptive.

The revisions to the FTC’s Green Guides reflect a wide range of public input, including hundreds of consumer and industry comments on previously proposed revisions.  They include updates to the existing Guides, as well as new sections on the use of carbon offsets, “green” certifications and seals, and renewable energy and renewable materials claims.

“The introduction of environmentally friendly products into the marketplace is a win for consumers who want to purchase greener products and for producers who want to sell them,” said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz.  “But this win-win can only occur if marketers’ claims are truthful and substantiated.  The FTC’s changes to the Green Guides will level the playing field for honest business people and it is one reason why we had such broad support.”

In revising the Green Guides, the FTC modified and clarified sections of the previous Guides and provided new guidance on environmental claims that were not common when the Guides were last reviewed.

Revisions to Previous Guidance. Among other modifications, the Guides caution marketers not to make broad, unqualified claims that a product is “environmentally friendly” or “eco-friendly” because the FTC’s consumer perception study confirms that such claims are likely to suggest that the product has specific and far-reaching environmental benefits.  Very few products, if any, have all the attributes consumers seem to perceive from such claims, making these claims nearly impossible to substantiate.

The Guides also:

  • advise marketers not to make an unqualified degradable claim for a solid waste product unless they can prove that the entire product or package will completely break down and return to nature within one year after customary disposal;
  • caution that items destined for landfills, incinerators, or recycling facilities will not degrade within a year, so marketers should not make unqualified degradable claims for these items; and
  • clarify guidance on compostable, ozone, recyclable, recycled content, and source reduction claims.

New Sections.  The Guides contain new sections on: 1) certifications and seals of approval; 2) carbon offsets, 3) free-of claims, 4) non-toxic claims, 5) made with renewable energy claims, and 6) made with renewable materials claims.

The new section on certifications and seals of approval, for example, emphasizes that certifications and seals may be considered endorsements that are covered by the FTC’s Endorsement Guides, and includes examples that illustrate how marketers could disclose a “material connection” that might affect the weight or credibility of an endorsement.  In addition, the Guides caution marketers not to use environmental certifications or seals that don’t clearly convey the basis for the certification, because such seals or certifications are likely to convey general environmental benefits.

Finally, either because the FTC lacks a sufficient basis to provide meaningful guidance or wants to avoid proposing guidance that duplicates or contradicts rules or guidance of other agencies, the Guides do not address use of the terms “sustainable,” “natural,” and “organic.”  Organic claims made for textiles and other products derived from agricultural products are covered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program.

The FTC first issued its Green Guides in 1992 to help marketers avoid making misleading environmental claims.  It revised the Guides in 1996 and 1998, and proposed further revisions in October 2010 to take into account recent changes in the marketplace.  The guidance they provide includes:

  • general principles that apply to all environmental marketing claims;
  • how consumers are likely to interpret particular claims, and how marketers can substantiate these claims; and
  • how marketers can qualify their claims to avoid deceiving consumers.

The Guides issued today take into account nearly 340 unique comments and more than 5,000 total comments received since the FTC released the proposed revised Guides in the fall of 2010.  They also include information gathered from three public workshops and a study of how consumers perceive and understand environmental claims.

The Green Guides are not agency rules or regulations.  Instead, they describe the types of environmental claims the FTC may or may not find deceptive under Section 5 of the FTC Act.   Under Section 5, the agency can take enforcement action against deceptive claims, which ultimately can lead to Commission orders prohibiting deceptive advertising and marketing and fines if those orders are later violated.

The FTC has brought several actions in recent years related to deceptive recyclability, biodegradable, bamboo, and environmental certification claims as part of its overall effort to ensure that environmental marketing is truthful and substantiated.

Consumer and Business Education.  The FTC today also released several business and consumer education resources designed to help users understand the Guides.  These include: 1) “Environmental Claims – Summary of Green Guides,” a four-page summary of the changes in the Guides; 2) “The Green Guides,” a video explaining highlights of the changes; 3) a new page on the FTC Business Center, with links to legal documents, the Guides and other “green” content; 4) a Business Center blog post; and 5) related consumer information.

The Commission vote approving the Guides was 5-0.  They will be published in the Federal Register notice shortly and are not subject to public comment.

The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them.  To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357).  The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 2,000 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.  The FTC’s website provides free information on a variety of consumer topics.  Like the FTC on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.

 

SOURCE Federal Trade Commission
PR Newswire (http://s.tt/1oQ7f)

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Cause Marketing: Are You a Supporter – or Just Jumping on the Bandwagon?

October 2nd, 2012 No comments

How Involved Are You With the Cause You are Marketing or Promoting?

Cause Marketing: How Passionate Are you?

Cause Marketing: Are You a Supporter – or Just Jumping on the Bandwagon?

Austin, Texas: Cause marketing is here in full bloom this month.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and companies of all types are giving away pink mugs, pink tote bags, pink pencils, etc.  With the exception of  a few well-known organizations that make the fight against breast cancer a part of their every day marketing campaigns, most of these other businesses are jumping on the pink bandwagon.  I call it Pink Washing.

Just because a company prints a pink ribbon on their menu or on their website does not mean that they are passionate about the fight against breast cancer — and it muddies the waters. Are they supporting and promoting awareness of early breast cancer detection and the fight for a cure – or are they just jumping on the pink bandwagon?

Don’t get me wrong.  I know first hand about the ravages of cancer, having lost my mother to the battle nearly 12 years ago and having many other family members and close friends battle the disease.

But it should not become part of one’s advertising and marketing scheme unless the organization supports the cause, through donations, education, forums, etc.

It is insincere and smacks of opportunism.

Green washing is no different.

Too many companies try to print a green ribbon on a product and pretend that they are an eco-friendly organization when they are not. Green Washing.

So is placing a candidate’s yard sign on your lawn and not knowing anything about the candidate, other than his political party. Opportunism. Red-White-Blue Washing?!!?

If you are going to get involved in cause marketing, you must be a supporter of the issue.

Be passionate about it.

Promote it.

Donate to it — both financially and with your time.

Educate others about it.

Strike up conversations with others and defend the cause.  Not argue or shout-down somebody from the other side.  But defend and discuss it with logic and reason.

Find a cause they you want to support and make it a part of your marketing agenda.

But don’t just jump on a bandwagon just to win a few voters, customers, donors, etc.

People will be able to see right through it.

What cause are you passionate about?

I’m talking passionate–not lukewarm.

Not:  “It would be kinda nice to support the kid down the street’s issue”…

Not: “Little Johnny’s school is raising money for this cause, so might as well do it too”….

Where is your passion?

What can you do to get more involved with it today?

What cause can you dedicated time and resources to supporting and promoting?

Now, take 3 action steps today to move forward in becoming active in a cause near and dear to your heart.

That’s right.  Near and dear to YOUR heart.

The passion will show through!

Please share with us what steps you have taken to get involved with a cause so we can share it with others and inspire them too.

 

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Ask us Your Green Marketing Questions Anytime at  Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutions and join the conversation.

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Robert Piller, President of Eco Marketing Solutions, has over 25 years of experience in running and implementing green marketing campaigns and is a leader in the recycled promotional products industry, including offering one of the largest selections of reusable and organic tote bags, recycled and biodegradable water bottles, recycled pens and pencils in the country.

His company’s website, EcoMarketingSolutions.com, features over 25,000 eco-friendly promotional items in all price ranges, for any business or organization interested in going green. The site’s handy search tool helps you easily find biodegradable, organic and recycled imprinted promotional items in your price range and time frame.

You can also reach him by email (robert (at) ecomarketingsolutions.com) or comment on his blog postings at GreenSpotBlog.com or below at his Twitter link.

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Greenwashing Rears Its Ugly Head Again: Truth About Organic Foods

September 4th, 2012 No comments

Organic foods not more nutritious than non-organic foods, new study saysNew Study Shows That organic food is no more nutritious than non-organic foods

Austin, Texas: There is a new study that has been making the rounds on the Internet, newspapers, blogs and daytime talk shows–that organic food is no more nutritious than non-organic foods.

Duh!

I am not sure where anybody got the idea that an organically grown tomato had more vitamin A and vitamin C than non-organic tomatoes.

Is it due to greenwashing?

Perhaps.

People flock to Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s and other specialty stores looking for organically grown food that are pesticide -free and antibiotic-free for health reasons.  If they think that the vitamin levels are higher, then they are misinformed, misled, lied to or they hear what they want to hear and believe what they want to believe.

 Greenwashing is wrong for a number of reasons, including moral and ethical ones.

However, the big loser in greenwashing is the green movement itself.

People will hear or read the headlines and come away with the fact that organic products are not better than non-organic products — and the organic movement will take a huge hit.

Over-promising the benefits or organically-grown food over the past decade has led to confusion in the marketplace.

Confusion leads to misleading statements and claims – as well as misunderstanding by consumers.

The organic  movement needs to go back to the education phase and let people know the dangers of hormones, antibiotics and pesticides in their food.

Not make false claims or vague claims that the food is healthier.

“Healthier” can mean different things to different people – and most consumers probably thought healthier meant more vitamins and minerals.

My philosphy has always been that an educated consumer is the most loyal consumer.

In my own business, I spend a great deal educating my clients on the value of marrying their environmental message with environmentally-friendly branding and promotional product and marketing solutions.

No hyperboles.

I try to let them know the percentage of the product that is made from recycled materials, how it can be recycled, etc.

Vagueness leads to confusions.

Greenwashing leads to chaos in the marketplace.

Let’s all learn from this new study – and go back to the basics of messaging.

State your benefits clearly.

Do not mislead.

Spell it out for your customers.

Hype leads to misinformation.

Let’s be clearer in our marketing message and we can advance the green movement by leaps and bounds.

There are too many “doubters” out there looking to stop the environmental movement with silliness and stupidity like this attention-grabbing study.

We’re all in the green movement together.

Let’s demand more transparency and more honesty in our claims.

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Ask Us Your Green Marketing Questions Anytime at  Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutions and join the conversation.

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Robert Piller, President of Eco Marketing Solutions, has over 25 years of experience in running and implementing green marketing campaigns and is a leader in the recycled promotional products industry, including offering one of the largest selections of reusable and organic tote bags, recycled and biodegradable water bottles, recycled pens and pencils in the country.

His company’s website, EcoMarketingSolutions.com, features over 25,000 eco-friendly promotional items in all price ranges, for any business or organization interested in going green. The site’s handy search tool helps you easily find biodegradable, organic and recycled imprinted promotional items in your price range and time frame.

You can also reach him by email (robert (at) ecomarketingsolutions.com) or comment on his blog postings at GreenSpotBlog.com or below at his Twitter link.

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Do We Really Need the Good Housekeeping Green Seal for Eco Retail Products?

July 9th, 2012 No comments
Are there already too many green symbols out there in the marketplace

Are there already too many green symbols out there in the marketplace?

Austin, Texas: Proctor and Gamble is putting a lot of marketing dollars behind Good Housekeeping’s Green Seals, which it had launched a few years back, according to a recent article in GreenBiz.com.

I think it is a noble move to have a well respected third party determine the level of green in a product.  It is always nice to understand whether a product is sustainable, uses organic and all natural ingredients – or is trying to disguise their product with greenwashing.

However, as I have mentioned before, the “unintended” consequence of these competing symbols often end up leading to greater confusion.

It is too easy to come up with graphics similar to the Good Housekeeping Green Seals designs- that will falsely portray a product as green when it is not.

I argue for one set of industry standards for green marketing claims.

Just one.

Perhaps now that Proctor and Gamble is using it, giant retailers like Walmart will insist that these, and only these, symbols be used to identify green products.

However, until that time comes, caveat emptor.

Let the buyer beware.

Be skeptical of green symbols.

Do your due diligence and research what green claims a product is making and how they determined its level of “greenness”.

Has it certified by an INDEPENDENT lab?

What is the track record of the company making the claim.

Is their a QR code that easily takes you to a page that explains how they determined the green value of their claim?

Don’t accept green claims at face value until you have done your research.

Ask questions.

Demand more of a company’s claim than just a green symbol.

An educated consumer is still the best consumer.

Let’s put an end to dozens of green symbols that only obfuscate the truth.

Let’s say NO to ambiguity and insist on one set of standards for all green claims.

Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutionsAsk us Your Green Marketing Questions Anytime at  Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutions and join the conversation.

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Robert Piller, President of Eco Marketing Solutions, has over 25 years of experience in running and implementing green marketing campaigns and is a leader in the recycled promotional products industry, including offering one of the largest selections of reusable and organic tote bags, recycled and biodegradable water bottles, recycled pens and pencils in the country.

His company’s website, EcoMarketingSolutions.com, features over 25,000 eco-friendly promotional items in all price ranges, for any business or organization interested in going green. The site’s handy search tool helps you easily find biodegradable, organic and recycled imprinted promotional items in your price range and time frame.

You can also reach him by email (robert (at) ecomarketingsolutions.com) or comment on his blog postings at GreenSpotBlog.com or below at his Twitter link.

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Green Marketing 101: Watch for Greenwashing

May 31st, 2012 No comments

Do not green wash in your advertsiingAustin, Texas: Greenwashing has become so prevalent in advertising that many people stop believing most of what they read.  This is good news for those marketers that are try to obfuscate the truth or those that tend to exaggerate their claims.

But for true green companies, greenwashing is a problem that must be addressed.

According to Wikipedia, the term Greenwashing (a compound word modelled on “whitewash”), or “green sheen”  is a form of spin in which green PR or green marketing is deceptively used to promote the perception that an organization’s aims and policies are environmentally friendly. Whether it is to increase profits or gain political support, greenwashing may be used to manipulate popular opinion to support otherwise questionable aims.

Take the Hanes That I saw in an industry magazine the other day.

They call this T-shirt EcoSmart and shout “Sustainability at great everyday prices”.  Sounds environmentally-friendly–right?

Unfortunately, below that sustainability claim, they mention that the shirt contains up to 5% polyester from recycled plastic.

Up to 5%!?!?  .0001% is up to 5%. So is 1%. So is 2% ….

If you are going to make a green claim, substantiate it with facts and do not try to mislead.

Even if this shirt contained 5% recycled material, would it really be a green product?

One of the keys to green marketing is substantiating the claims.

Perhaps a link or QR code that takes you to more detailed information or an infographic about the recycling process.

Perhaps a short video of the recycling process.

But definitely a more honest approach then calling a product that has 5% or less of its contents made from recycled material and EcoSmart product.

A few bad apples does ruin it for green marketing and the entire green movement.

It is time to call major advertisers out on it when greenwashing is so blatant.

Let’s put truth back into marketing anfd advertising campaigns so companies can focus on truly becoming more sustainable and green friendly.

Let’s create real green brands and promote true green branding and eco marketing.

Happy promoting!

Here’s to a green tomorrow, today!
Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutionsAsk us Your Green Marketing Questions Anytime at  Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutions and join the conversation.

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Robert Piller, President of Eco Marketing Solutions, has over 25 years of experience in running and implementing green marketing campaigns and is a leader in the recycled promotional products industry, including offering one of the largest selections of reusable and organic tote bags, recycled and biodegradable water bottles, recycled pens and pencils in the country.

His company’s website, EcoMarketingSolutions.com, features over 25,000 eco-friendly promotional items in all price ranges, for any business or organization interested in going green. The site’s handy search tool helps you easily find biodegradable, organic and recycled imprinted promotional items in your price range and time frame.

You can also reach him by email (robert (at) ecomarketingsolutions.com) or comment on his blog postings at GreenSpotBlog.com or below at his Twitter link.

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How Committed Is Your Company To The Green Movement?

September 30th, 2011 No comments

Green Marketing?  Where is Your Commitment?Austin, Texas: As I watch the Republican Presidential debates over the past few weeks, I am amazed at  the lack of commitment by any candidate on most major issues.

Answers  by all seem to be vague, ambiguous and wishy-washy.  There is certainly no passion that comes across to the viewing public.

Is this like your company’s stand on the environment–vague, ambiguous and wishy-washy?

People can easily cut through this B.S. and tell that you are not truly committed.

Green Washing?  No, too many companies do Green Lying, where they knowingly are not green but pretend to be.

If you are a green marketer or an organization going green, how are you living that commitment?

Jut by having the word “green” or “environmentally-friendly” on you packaging or in your mission statement doesn’t make you a green company.

Where is your passion?

How is your company reducing its energy consumption?

How are you reducing packaging waste?

How are you encouraging car pooling by your employees, inspiring greener procedures at work and changing your green lifestyle?

Going green is like fitness….. you need to be committed to it in order to be successful.

Show some passion to the green movement and get involved.

Practice what you preach.

Live the lifestyle.

Your organization will gain a great deal more credibility..and your commitment will show.

I’ll vote for that!

Ask Us Your Green Marketing Questions Anytime at  Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutions and join the conversation.
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Robert Piller, president of Eco Marketing Solutions, is experienced in green marketing campaigns and recycled promotional products.

His company’s website, EcoMarketingSolutions.com, features over 25,000 eco-friendly promotional items in all price ranges, for any business or organization interested in going green. The site’s handy search tool helps you easily find biodegradable, organic and recycled imprinted promotional items in your price range and time frame.

You can also reach him by email (robert (at) ecomarketingsolutions.com) or comment on his blog postings at GreenSpotBlog.com or below at his Twitter link.

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The Green Guides Are Coming: What to Do?

August 3rd, 2011 No comments

The Green Guides Will define green marketing terminologyAustin, Texas: Marketers and the media are anxiously anticipating the release of the new FTC Green Guides, which will list the new rules for use of green marketing advertising–a sort of truth in advertising campaign.

Although the dates keep getting pushed back, when it is announced, the Green Guides will shift the landscape of green marketing–in the hopes of preventing greenwashing.

There is a great deal of news that terms such as green, carbon neutral, renewable energy and others will be re-defined… but nobody knows the final rulings.

What should a green marketer do?

Tell the Truth. The Whole Truth. And Nothing but the Truth.

Yes.  It’s that simple.

If you make a claim, back it up.

If you say an item is biodegradable, explain how your company defines this term. How long it takes to break down and in what environment.

If you say something is “green”, describe how it is green. Does it save resources in manufacturing or during usage?

If you say an item is made of recycled materials, tell the percentage and the material used.

Spell it out.

If you define the item and explain it, then your customer can compare it to other products and make an informed decision.

Do we like the government telling us what to say, how to say it, etc? Absolutely not.  But these guidelines are to be created because too many companies abused the lack of definitive definitions.

Promoting your green product or service is not hard.

Explain. Educate. Define.

State your benefits clearly and concisely.

Don’t leave any grey space.

Anticipate the questions and concerns your clients may have, and answer them.

That is all the public needs and wants.

Happy Promoting!
Ask Us Your Green Marketing Questions Anytime at  Facebook.com/ecomarketingsolutions and join the conversation.
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Robert Piller, President of Eco Marketing Solutions, has over 25 years of experience in running and implementing green marketing campaigns and is a leader in the recycled promotional products industry, including offering one of the largest selections of reusable and organic tote bags, recycled and biodegradable water bottles, recycled pens and pencils in the country.

His company’s website, EcoMarketingSolutions.com, features over 25,000 eco-friendly promotional items in all price ranges, for any business or organization interested in going green. The site’s handy search tool helps you easily find biodegradable, organic and recycled imprinted promotional items in your price range and time frame.

You can also reach him by email (robert (at) ecomarketingsolutions.com) or comment on his blog postings at GreenSpotBlog.com or below at his Twitter link.

Follow ecomarketing on Twitter

SC Johnson Lawsuit Shows the Need for 3rd Party Certification

July 11th, 2011 No comments

be sure to use a 3rd party licensed company for green claimsRather than admit to being guilty, SC Johnson settled some lawsuits last week over its green certification claims, according to an article in GreenBiz.com.

This should shed a light on green certification programs.

Recently, many companies seem to be trying to cut corners and budget by testing their own products for lead, and certifying their products as green.  Hand held lead testing equipment prices have been falling, while third party certification still remains relatively high, causing many companies of all sizes to trim costs.

I am one for saving money in certain ares, but third party certification is not one of those.  Neither is product safety.

If you are going to make green claims, then back it up with legitimate claims.

Be sure your claims are transparent.

If you are going to put one of the dozens of green seals of certification on your product or product packaging, be sure it is from a reputable 3rd party testing lab.

Saying you are the greatest or greenest or smartest or best looking, etc. does not make it so.  Having third party certification makes it much more so.

Please learn from the SC Johnson situation.  Don’t be penny wise and dollar foolish when it comes to green certification claims.

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Robert Piller, President of Eco Marketing Solutions, has over 25 years of experience in running and implementing green marketing campaigns and is a leader in the recycled promotional products industry, including offering one of the largest selections of reusable and organic tote bags, recycled and biodegradable water bottles, recycled pens and pencils in the country.

His company’s website, EcoMarketingSolutions.com, features over 25,000 eco-friendly promotional items in all price ranges, for any business or organization interested in going green. The site’s handy search tool helps you easily find biodegradable, organic and recycled imprinted promotional items in your price range and time frame.

You can also reach him by email (robert (at) ecomarketingsolutions.com) or comment on his blog postings at GreenSpotBlog.com or below at his Twitter link.

Follow ecomarketing on Twitter

Should We Be Condemning Greenwashing- Or Assume It Is Just Ignorance?

June 17th, 2011 No comments

is the term greenwashing over usedIn the past few weeks, I have read over a dozen articles and blogs condemning the act of greenwashing.

It seems that “the left” has declared war on the evils of greenwashing– but has forgotten about the virtues of going green itself.

Is greenwashing really a sin?

Can we really even recognize greenwashing?

Is the term “greenwashing” over used and over-hyped?

Sure, there are still too many companies that deliberately exaggerate – or even lie – about the green virtues of their product. They may claim that their product is made from 40% recycled, post-consumer plastic, for example, without using any recycled materials at all.

Greenwashing. No–that would be outright fraud…and should be condemned. This is preying on the unknowing.

I am not advocating greenwashing, at all.  That is certainly not the idea of this blog post.

Instead, I am talking about companies that are actively pursuing policies to “go green” — yet don’t meet the “absolutely green” purity test.

I would argue that there is no product that can be truly green, so people need to expect a little over-exuberance in marketing a legitimately green product.

Most greenwashing claims are from exaggeration, not fraud.

Does that make it right? No. And it should be toned down, and claims should be presented more accurately.

I posed a question on LinkedIn a few weeks asking if a product can be 100% Green–and nobody was able to find one that could be able to be made available for public consumption.

Sure, there were a few answers, such as “getting milk from a cow” or growing your own fruits and vegetables.  However, if you took those products across town in a truck, then it no longer would be considered 100% green.
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